Quantcast
Skip to main content

Did North Korea Try To Attack The Superbowl?

north-korea-rocket_2477903b

Tensions are high with North Korea, since they used a rocket to launch an object into space.

Now we know more about what the object was and where it was going.

Spoiler: It involves the Superbowl

Via Fox News

Whatever motives Pyongyang may have about using its rocket launches to develop nuclear-tipped long-range missiles, it now has two satellites circling the Earth, according to NORAD, the North American Aerospace Command, which monitors all satellites in orbit.

Both of the Kwangmyongsong, or “Shining Star,” satellites complete their orbits in about 94 minutes and based on data released by international organizations tracking them, the new one passed almost right over Levi’s Stadium about an hour after the Super Bowl ended.

“It passed almost directly overhead Silicon Valley, which is where I am and where the stadium is,” tech watcher Martyn Williams said in an email to The Associated Press. “The pass happened at 8:26 p.m., after the game. I would put it down to nothing more than a coincidence, but an interesting one.”

The game in Santa Clara, California, ended at 7:25 p.m. localtime.

North Korea claims Sunday’s successful satellite launch was its fourth.

The first two have never been confirmed by anyone else, but experts worldwide agree it got one into orbit in 2012 and NORAD, which is hardly a propaganda mouthpiece for Pyongyang, now has both that and the satellite launched on Sunday on its official satellite list.

Kwangmyongsong 4, the satellite launched Sunday, has the NORAD catalog number 41332 and Kwangmyongsong 3-2, launched in 2012, is 39026. They are described as Earth observation satellites, and weigh about 220 pounds apiece.

What was the object doing over the Superbowl site?

Maybe it was just by chance, but it does seem a bit weird, doesn’t it?

Now Watch This:

Do we need to take action against the North Koreans? Share your thoughts!

Comments

Advertisement