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Rifle Targeting Manufacturer Sues NBC For Slander

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Last week, the Today Show produced a segment in which the company Tannerite Sports was portrayed as a national security threat for selling “bombs” at their stores.

Tannerite, a small business that sells rifle targets, is fighting back, suing NBC and a local affiliate for libel and slander.

The targets in question can not be detonated using an electric charge, by lighting a fuse or smashing them.

Yet, NBC equated them to the materials used in the Oklahoma City bombing.

Tannerite isn’t taking the smear campaign lying down.

Via Bearing Arms:

NBC News and a local affiliate have being slapped with a libel and slander lawsuit for March, 23, 2015 report that aired on Today (also known as The Today Show) entitled, “Bombs for Sale? Popular Stores Sell ‘Dangerous Explosives.’”

Attorneys representing Tannerite Sports filed suit against NBC Universal News Group (NBCU) and Lexington, KY-based WLEX Communications for libel and slander for allegedly defamatory print and video reports from NBC News national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen.

The video segment on Today ran in conjunction with an equally inflammatory print story on the Today web site with the headline, Bombs for sale: Targets containing dangerous explosive being sold legally. WLEX ran a version of the Today article that also allegedly claimed that it is illegal under federal law to mix the two component parts of Tannerite, which is factually false.

Bearing Arms debunked these apparently defamatory reports from NBC News national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen the day they aired.

Here is the overly sensationalized Today Show report…

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The lawsuit claims that NBC’s statements pertaining to the company “were made maliciously, intentionally, and with reckless disregard for the truth.”

In other words, just another NBC broadcast.

Does the company have a chance to win the lawsuit? Should more companies respond to false anti-gun reports in the same manner?

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